Meaning of dating violence Photo web camera raven riley

Meaning of dating violence

According to the 2007 Youth Risk Behavior Survey, approximately 10 percent of adolescents nationwide reported being the victim of physical violence at the hands of a romantic partner during the previous year.[1] The rate of psychological victimization is even higher: Between two and three in 10 reported being verbally or psychologically abused in the previous year, according to the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health.[2] As for perpetration rates, there are currently no nationwide estimates for who does the abusing, and state estimates vary significantly.

In South Carolina, for example, nearly 8 percent of adolescents reported being physically violent to a romantic partner.

And so, to help further the discussion, we offer in this article a gender-based analysis of teen dating violence with a developmental perspective.[5] We look at what we know — and what we don't know — about who is the perpetrator and who is the victim in teen dating violence.

We also discuss how adult and adolescent romantic relationships differ in the hope that an examination of existing research will help us better understand the problem and move the field toward the creation of developmentally appropriate prevention programs and effective interventions for teenagers.

Concepts of interest included: dating norms, ecological factors, elements of healthy and unhealthy relationships, and prevention strategies.

Four themes emerged: respect versus disrespect, influence of friends, cost and benefit of sexual activity and violence as an acceptable response.

This includes any behaviors that intimidate, manipulate, humiliate, isolate, frighten, terrorize, coerce, threaten, blame, hurt, injure, or wound someone.

"the intentional use of physical force or power, threatened or actual, against oneself, another person, or against a group or community, that either results in or has a high likelihood of resulting in injury, death, psychological harm, maldevelopment, or deprivation."The WRVH also presents a typology of violence that, while not uniformly accepted, can be a useful way to understand the contexts in which violence occurs and the interactions between types of violence.

This typology distinguishes four modes in which violence may be inflicted: physical; sexual; and psychological attack; and deprivation.

Physical Abuse: Hitting, slapping, shoving, grabbing, pinching, biting, hair pulling, etc are types of physical abuse.

This type of abuse also includes denying a partner medical care or forcing alcohol and/or drug use upon him or her.

meaning of dating violence-44meaning of dating violence-49meaning of dating violence-82

Consequently, those in the field have to rely on an framework to examine the problem of teen dating violence.

Join our conversation (11 Comments).
Click Here To Leave Your Comment Meaning of dating violence.

Comments:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *